ECMMA offers four learning tracks at our biennial convention to bring together practitioners from many specialties to interact with and learn from each other. We are proud to partner with the Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group (ECM SRIG), offering opportunities for practitioners and researchers to encourage each other’s work. Pedagogy, movement, therapy, research.



Choose a session type or track below to see the presenters that will be at the Move Along, Catch a Song Convention in Salt Lake City June 26-29.



Download the full schedule (subject to change)

Singing Games and Folk Dances for All Ages

Leslie Timmons
Movement Track

Singing Games and Folk Dances for All Ages

Meet your fellow conference attendees in this interactive movement session. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes!

 


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Keynote Address

Linda Robinson
Keynote Presenter

The Greater Atlanta Chapter of ECMMA and Jean Ellen Linkins are proud to co-sponsor Linda Robinson's keynote address.

We are excited to welcome Linda Robinson, the founding President of ECMMA, as the keynote presenter at the Move Along, Catch a Song Convention. 

Celebrating our Journey - Poised for New Pathways is the title of Linda's keynote address. 

Linda invites you to reflect, imagine and participate. 

To reflect on your personal journey with early childhood music and movement


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Breakout Session: Jill Hannagan: "Introduction to Music Makers: At the Keyboard"

Jill Hannagan
Track

Participants will be led through a 5-week course that will give children a comprehensive introduction to group piano. Perfect as a summer camp offering, an introduction for new students or as an offering for those children who might be “aging out”of your current program. Singing, drumming, dancing, note reading, and keyboard skills will be actively explored in this session.


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Breakout Session: Eric Rasmussen: "Harmonic Function Understanding in Children One to Five Years Old"

Eric Rasmussen
Track

When were you introduced to tonic, dominant, and subdominant functions? When did you first understand them? I was “taught” them in high school music theory class during my junior year. Yet, I struggled in my college ear training classes. Why? I understood the theory I had been taught, but I had not understood their real essence. I propose that functions do not exist on paper, in explaining, or even in music notation. All of this is an abstraction away from the music that children come to naturally understand.


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Breakout Session: Carol Penney: "Essential Ingredients of a Successful Learning Environment"

Carol Penney
Track

Music is the perfect vehicle for an integrated learning experience for preschoolers with activities that support the development of the brain’s executive function. Explore how music educators can support focus, cognitive flexibility, working memory and inhibitory control. Another essential ingredient for a successful learning environment is the educator’s approach in permeating the classroom with trust, respect and presence.


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Planning Musical Experience in Early Childhood

Sylvia Munsen
Pedagogy Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 2 - see other required sessions

Participants will experience activities appropriate for young children focusing on musical engagement and the development of independent and collaborative musicianship skills. This session will present the planning, implementation, sequencing, and assessment of the activities including opportunities for children to experience and reinforce elements of music (melody, rhythm, timbre, form, dynamics) through areas of musical participation (singing, moving, playing, listening, creating, reading) and strategies for motivating children to fully participate in the musical experience.


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Cultural Celebration

Dr. Sylvia Munsen
Pedagogy Track

Participants will experience activities appropriate for young children focusing on music from many cultures and traditions. Participants will experience and explore a variety of materials: folk songs, folk instruments, movement/dances, and literature. The teaching strategies will be based on Orff-Schulwerk philosophy and teaching process.


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Books that Sing - Stories that Dance! Incorporating Music, Movement, and Imagination with Literature!

Lara Davis
Pedagogy Track

This active session will enhance dramatic skills through interactive participation! Attendees will explore techniques for integrating music & movement with books & storytelling to promote fundamental music concepts, creativity, cross-curricular connections, and literacy with their young students. Activities will range from expanding rhythmic text into simple song & finger plays - to full dramatization incorporating movement, instruments, props, classical listening selections, and more!


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Let's Jam!: Creating Jam Sessions with Young Children

Dr. Kerry Renzoni
Pedagogy Track

In this interactive workshop, learn how to create engaging jam sessions that help young children develop music vocabulary, encourage them to take creative music-making risks, and create community with other children, caregivers, and teachers. You will receive a handout with helpful strategies for creating jam sessions in your classroom and encouraging parents to jam at home with their children.


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Scared of a 'Group' of Young Beginners? Try Piano Partners!

Dr Mary Louise Wilson
Pedagogy Track

Group keyboard classes can offer many benefits for young children--from problem-solving to building aural skills; from goal setting to playing by ear and note-reading. The peer-group setting can create an ideal music learning environment for children. But teaching group keyboard classes can be intimidating for traditional piano teachers who generally teach one-on-one lessons. This session will introduce the concept of 'partner lessons' which can offer the same benefits as group keyboard classes but be taught to two young children in a small studio setting with one piano.


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Summer Songs, Toddle Tunes and Dribble Dance

Mrs Saskia Beverloo
Pedagogy Track

Parents and their young children (0 – 4 year olds) love to come to music class. Behind the fun is the pedagogy: each of the activities stimulates one or more development areas like language and speech development, motor skills, social development and musical development.

In this session the audience will be involved in singing, dancing, rhythm games, finger play and sound games. The activities will be followed by a closer look into the developmental goals of each activity and insights in how to make a balanced music program.


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Singing Voice Development in Early Childhood

Dr. Christina Svec
Pedagogy Track

Singing voice development begins in early childhood and can be encouraged through repertoire with the developmental component in mind. Svec will briefly discuss the research behind singing voice development for children, ages 4-7. Additionally, the audience will experience and participate in vocal exploration and melodic improvisation activities as well as view classroom examples of video footage demonstrating what activities look like with children in both early childhood music classes and early elementary music settings.


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Keep Singing YOUR Tune, and Families will Dance Right into Your Studio!

Ms Jane Spinney
Pedagogy & Music Therapy Track

Keep singing and moving to your tune! With passion, dedication and determination, your song will be heard by families who will dance right to you and your studio. This session endeavors to inspire the entrepreneurial spirit to build and grow a successful early childhood music & piano studio. Business strategies to be explored include: how to start, creating a mission statement, advertising & recruitment, time management, social media tools, accounting, taxes and more.


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Want to Learn to Play Music? Start By Playing WITH Music!

Dr Andrew Knight
Pedagogy Track

This session explores how children learn music through play, including the benefits and characteristics of music play. Before children can play (i.e. perform) music, they must first play with music. In this session, participants will discover the ways in which exposing children to developmentally appropriate, non performance-oriented music activities supports a child's innate tendency to play.


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