ECMMA offers four learning tracks at our biennial convention to bring together practitioners from many specialties to interact with and learn from each other. We are proud to partner with the Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group (ECM SRIG), offering opportunities for practitioners and researchers to encourage each other’s work. Pedagogy, movement, therapy, research.



Choose a session type or track below to see the presenters that will be at the Move Along, Catch a Song Convention in Salt Lake City June 26-29.



Download the full schedule (subject to change)

Breakout Session: Linda Robinson: "Keep the Music Going: Helping the Classroom Teacher Provide Musical Leadership"

Linda Robinson
Track

This session will focus on the team-building of music specialist, center director, and classroom teacher in order to provide music/movement experiences in preschool classrooms. Discussion on the roles of each member of the team as well as their “growing points” will give an understanding of the dynamics of the team.


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Singing Games and Folk Dances for All Ages

Leslie Timmons
Movement Track

Singing Games and Folk Dances for All Ages

Meet your fellow conference attendees in this interactive movement session. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes!

 


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Keynote Address

Linda Robinson
Keynote Presenter

The Greater Atlanta Chapter of ECMMA and Jean Ellen Linkins are proud to co-sponsor Linda Robinson's keynote address.

We are excited to welcome Linda Robinson, the founding President of ECMMA, as the keynote presenter at the Move Along, Catch a Song Convention. 

Celebrating our Journey - Poised for New Pathways is the title of Linda's keynote address. 

Linda invites you to reflect, imagine and participate. 

To reflect on your personal journey with early childhood music and movement


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General Session: Jill Trinka: "Hear, Feel, Move, Sing"

Jill Trinka
Track

This session will explore music appropriate for developing young children’s experiential understanding of musical concepts while simultaneously developing their musical skills. Particular attention will be on authentic children’s traditional oral repertoire, including rhymes, chants, singing games, and folk songs; art music examples from piano and orchestral literature will also be presented.


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Breakout Session: Leilani Miranda: "Considerations for Storytelling in an Early Childhood Setting"

Leilani Miranda
Track

Storytelling can play a key role in the overall music and movement experience by engaging a perhaps otherwise distracted, disengaged, lethargic audience. However, successful storytelling in an early childhood music and movement setting should not just be about entertainment. With a background of knowledge of technique, story design, early childhood development and brain development, storytelling can be a valuable educational and emotionally beneficial activity for young children.


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Hall of Honor Presentation

Hall of Honor Presentation
Track

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Breakout Session: Marilyn Lowe: "Keyboard Games for Young Children"

Marilyn Lowe
Track

Keyboard lessons for young children are popular, in part because of the success of early childhood
music programs and in part because of research about how music affects the brain and learning in
general. This session focuses on steps that build a solid musical and performance foundation for four-to
seven-year-old children who have small bodies with little hands, are in constant motion, and have limited
experiences with and understanding of the elements that make music.


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Breakout Session: Sally Guerrero: "The Classic Connection"

Sally Guerrero
Track

Do you see the value of introducing children to Classical music but feel you don’t have the background or confidence to do this in a meaningful way? This workshop will demonstrate how you can guide children to enjoy Classical music, be moved by Classical music and move to Classical music. The starting place is a beautiful story book whose theme matches the music. You’ll learn to incorporate the music as you read the story. Then you’ll learn songs and fingerplays that correlate to the theme of each story along with activities for moving to the Classical music.


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Breakout Session: Jayne Standley: "Music Therapy for Premature Infants 1"

Jayne Standley
Track

Premature infants are at-risk and have a 50% greater need for special education when they achieve early intervention age. Understanding the problems and needs of the premature infant and uses of music to aid development will assist music specialists and day care providers.


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Breakout Session: Mary Stouffer: "The Jubilant Music Class"

Mary Stouffer
Track

INTEGRATING TRADITIONAL TEACHING WITH INTERACTIVE TOOLS FOR FLUENT READING, PERFORMING AND SUSTAINED INTEREST: Research has shown us that the brain is highly engaged when moving and singing, and when learning to play an instrument. What happens if we combine these two successful ways of learning music in the general classroom? In this study, one group of 6 year olds and one group of 7 year olds participated weekly in a music class that included fundamental musicianship skills, learning to move and sing confidently, and learning to play the piano keyboard.


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Breakout Session: Betty Smith: "Awwww! What Do I Do With this 3-6 Year Old Whose Parents Insist on Having Piano Lessons?"

Betty Smith
Track

Parents have heard all of the benefits of having their children take piano lessons at a young age. They are calling piano teachers in record numbers, requesting lessons beginning at the age of 2- 6. Many piano teachers just tell the parents to wait until the child is reading and in at least first grade.


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Breakout Session: Jo Kirk: "TIP TOE to DO-SI-DO: A Movement Sequence for Greater Success in Your Classroom"

Jo Kirk
Track

This ”energy packed/hands-on” session focuses on the development of the child’s movement, coordination, and musical skills. Exploring a variety of developmentally appropriate movement experiences, songs, finger plays, and singing games, participants will examine a movement sequence (simple to complex–solitary play to cooperative play) and acquire knowledge and skills to implement these strategies.


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Breakout Session: Alison Reynolds and Wendy Valerio: "Learning From Parents"

Alison Reynolds
Track

LEARNING FROM PARENTS: MUSIC BEHAVIORS DEMONSTRATED BY YOUNG CHILDREN WHO ATTEND
EARLY CHILDHOOD MUSIC PROGRAMS

What do parents/guardians notice about their children’s music behaviors at home? In this session, we share the results of our on-going research into this question, describe ways to make the research
relevant to practice, and invite participants to brainstorm future research ventures into the topic.


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Breakout Session: Christina Hornbach: "Top 10 Early Childhood Vocal Exploration and Singing Activities"

Christina Hornbach
Track

Early childhood music educators must be knowledgeable about what is musically and developmentally appropriate in order to maximize learning in the classroom. It is important that instructors provide an education in music that is informed by the knowledge of how children learn music; this knowledge may be gained from research, literature, and experienced practitioners.


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General Session: Cynthia Taggart: "Creating a Developmentally Appropriate Music Learning Environment"

Cynthia Taggart
Track

CREATING A DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE MUSIC LEARNING
ENVIRONMENT: PRINCIPLES THAT SHOULD UNDERPIN OUR PRACTICE

This session will highlight the guiding principles of developmentally appropriate early childhood music learning environments and will give early childhood music educators gateposts to use when making instructional decisions. It also will address how children’s musical, social, and cognitive development should play a role in making instructional decisions.


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Breakout Session: Edwin E. Gordon: "Question and Answer"

Edwin E. Gordon
Track

A chance for participants to ask Dr. Gordon questions relating to his keynote address, “Newborns, Preschool Children, and Music: Undesirable Consequences of Neglect."


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Breakout Session: Wendy Valerio: "Anthony, Autism, and Music as Reciprocal Communication"

Wendy Valerio
Track

Anthony is an 11-year-old boy with low-functioning autism. Annabel, Anthony’s mother, recalled that when Anthony was approximately 18-months-old, she began to notice his symptoms:

Well, first he stopped talking at all. He used to vocalize one-word requests, and he just stopped. And I just lost eye contact with him and the whole engagement piece, and he was totally shut out….. And he started having rituals, like lining up his toys, or just really obsessing over little things.


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Breakout Session: Mary Louise Wilson: "Meeting the Developmental Needs of Children Through Music and Movement"

Mary Louise Wilson
Track

This session is part of the “Georgia: Bright From the Start” teacher training.

The session is designed for the preschool teacher attending the Monday afternoon 4-hour tract to receive “GA Early Care and Professional Development: Bright for the Start”credit. This session has pre-approval from the state agency.

Movement and music activities are perfect for child development. Music immerses the child in language, evokes movement, stimulates the brain, and fosters physical coordination.


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Breakout Session: Manju Durairaj: "Teach Music Technology in Early Childhood Music Education"

Manju Durairaj
Track

This session demonstrates Smartboard and Powerpoint based music education activities and lessons for grades PreK-2. Participants will be guided through the process for choosing an existing or sample lesson plan and creating coordinating Powerpoint and Notebook files that include notation, visually appealing graphics and basic animation, as well as developmentally appropriate interactive games.


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Breakout Session: Brenda Haynes: "Using Music & Movement to Facilitate Literacy and Language Development in Pre-K and Primary"

Brenda Haynes
Track

Featuring a unique “all-in-the-box” early childhood music and movement curriculum developed specifically for non-parented preschool, kindergarten, and primary classrooms, this session speaks to a wide range of developmental issues, including language development, emergent literacy, listening skills, self control, and self-esteem are all addressed.


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Breakout Session: Susanne Burgess: "Slip, Slide ... Snakes Glide! Making meaning through movement, music, and rhyme"

Susanne Burgess
Track

In this session participants will engage in a multisensory exploration of opposites through the rich imagery found in Denise Fleming’s In the Tall, Tall Grass. Through this engaging children’s book we will merge experiences moving, playing instruments, and decoding and encoding text and images to compose new works and notate them. This work targets emergent readers for whom movement and music deepen literary understanding and expression, offering multiple modalities through which to demonstrate comprehension and creativity. 


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Breakout Sessions: Jessica Lee: "The Importance of Music and Movement for Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs"

Jessica Lee
Track

This workshop addresses the importance of providing quality music and movement experiences that en-gage the child, therapist, and the family with particular attention to the benefits to the child with special needs.


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Breakout Session: Thom Borden: "Little Treasures of Music Literacy"

Thom Borden
Track

Children’s literature can provide wonderful opportunities for movement and active music making while addressing comprehension strategies and language fluency. This session will provide your classroom with just a few favorites from your library shelves that you may wish to include in the upcoming months. Familiar singing games and play-parties that are taught in later grades are presented to early childhood teachers with an approach for “little treasures” that are in their classrooms.


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Learning Through the Arts: The Language of Dance

Mary Ann Lee
Movement Track

Using the children’s book, Red Sings from the Treetops, by Joyce Sidman as a springboard for dance and music, participants will move, investigate, create, and contextualize.  We shall move through the rhythm of words, note value, musical forms and create a narrative, poetry and dance based on seasons and colors.  


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Breakout Session: Cynthia Taggart: "Encouraging Music Play: Ideas for Teaching the Very Young"

Cynthia Taggart
Track

Participants will engage in activities that can be used to elicit musical responses from young children and encourage them to playfully participate in music. This session will demonstrate the concepts introduced in the General Session in action and will focus on teaching techniques that enrich any early childhood music classroom.


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Breakout Session: Stuart Stotts: "Singing in the Circle"

Stuart Stotts
Track

Singing is central to young children’s growth and learning. By adding movement, relevance, and repetition, we align our practice with known brain-based approaches. It is fun, educational, and it builds community and confidence in all involved.

In this session, we will sing, move, and laugh together. Songs and activities aligned with our understanding of how the brain works will give both practical hands-on ideas and a foundation in theory to apply to other music. Come to learn new songs and share old ones.

Participants are welcome to bring tape recorders.


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Breakout Session: Craig Woodson: "World Drumming and Instrument Making Skills "

Craig Woodson
Track

Participants will learn how to use world drumming and instrument making as demonstrated in three chapters of the Roots of Rhythm (ROR) curriculum, a free, online teacher’s guide by Dr. Craig Woodson. In the first breakout session, attendees will make and play a simple ‘generic’ can drum (African model), make a friction drum (a Portuguese adufe), then turn them both into the bongos (a drum set from Cuba). The session ends with a group performance of Middle Eastern rhythms using the bongos as the naqqara drums from Turkey.


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Breakout Session: Rekha Rajan: "Do You Hear What I Hear?: Designing Child-Centered Musical Activities for Preschoolers"

Rekha Rajan
Track

Shake, rattle, and roll! Preschoolers love making music, but how can early childhood educators effectively provide young children with authentic musical experiences? Research in the field of early childhood music education has consistently documented the impact of music on children’s personal, social, and artistic development. This presentation will show one such research.


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Breakout Session: Beatriz Aguilar: "Juguemos A Contar: Traditional Mexican Songs and Cultural Identity"

Beatriz Aguilar
Track

Attendees will learn Hispanic songs and rhymes, experiencing and understanding the cultural context reflected on each song. The songs will be analyzed for their possible musical and extra-musical pedagogical uses.


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Breakout Session: Judy Panning: "Drumming up Fun"

Judy Panning
Track

Looking for ways to connect parents to your early childhood classes? Searching for something to offer for older children or an adult population you work with? Need to find an activity for whole-group partici-pation at a Family Music Night? Perhaps a drum circle would be fun! Drumming is a great way to build community, de-stress, and create wonderful music. It is available to skilled and unskilled musicians, and provides both structure and freedom in the music-making process.

Come ready to move, sing and play some instruments!


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Breakout Session: Craig Woodson: "Drum Circle"

Craig Woodson
Track

Participants will enjoy interactive group drumming with Dr. Craig Woodson as they play the five families of percussion typically found in drum circles, including hand drums (djembes, congas), metals sounds (cowbell, gangokui), wood sounds (wood block, claves), shakers (chocallos, maracas), and bass drums (djundjun). Attendees will learn some of the basics of drum circle facilitation and get a chance to practice these new skills. Part of the session will introduce Health Rhythms on the physical and emotional
benefits of this particular drumming protocol.


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General Session: Ken Guilmartin: "What Does the Future Hold?"

Ken Guilmartin
Track

This session will present an overview of the presenter’s thoughts on contemporary early childhood music and movement education and its evolving future, especially in relation to:

  •   Traditional music education

  •   Developmentally appropriate practice

  •   Family life

  •   The social and cultural dynamics of music

  •   Research

  •   Getting the job done: challenges inherent in the “business” of early childhood music and movement education


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General Session: Petra Kern: "Tuneful Learning Experiences: Using Music for Skill Improvement in Young Children with ASD"

Petra Kern
Track

This presentation spotlights current information on ASD and research-based benefits of music therapy interventions for young clients on the spectrum. Tips on how to use music for intentional learning and online resources will be shared.


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Breakout Session: Denise Guilbult: "The Effects of Expressive Movement Instruction"

Denise Guilbult
Track

Does Laban Effort Element instruction affect the developmental rhythm aptitude and rhythm achievement of children in kindergarten? Laban’s stylistic movements of flow, weight, space, and time are being used in early childhood instruction and research. These types of questions are imperative to the body of research in early childhood music.


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Breakout Session: Joy Galliford: "Music: Brain Food for Babies"

Joy Galliford
Track
Age appropriate music activities are fun yet an essential way to nourish a baby’s brain and also foster his or her development. While caregivers of this age level may have training in how to stimulate and a baby’s development domains, providing daily musical activities for enrichment can be stimulating and fun for everyone involved not to mention the a significant impact (Jordan & Galliford, 2009).

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Breakout Session: Craig Woodson: "Using Our Drum Creations"

Craig Woodson
Track

Participants will learn how to use three new chapters from Dr. Woodson’s Roots of Rhythm curriculum (a free online curriculum). Participants will play speech rhythms on an African talking drum (dondo) that they make during the session. Then they will convert this instrument into a Japanese drum (kakko) to play ancient and unusual rhythms that relate to that of a bouncing ball. To conclude, participants will make a very simple instrument (sajat) to play dance rhythms from Egypt. Each idea has immediate
application in early childhood education.


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Breakout Session: Jayne Standley: "Music Therapy for Early Intervention with At-risk Infants"

Jayne Standley
Track

At-risk infants need early intervention for the entire array of developmental milestones. Music activities are an excellent resource for teaching across the spectrum of social, motor, language, and cognitive skills since they are uniquely attractive to infants and toddlers, can be taught in a group setting, can incorporate multisensory input, and promote both fine and gross motor abilities.


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Breakout Session: Dorothy Denton: "Music Education and Music Therapy: Notes in Service of the Young Child"

Dorothy Denton
Track

As more music therapists venture into working with very young children, and more early child-hood music educators work with children with special needs, there is a need to clarify the roles of each profession. However, it is important to delineate the roles and boundaries of music edu-cators and music therapists while learning how to inform the other in a supportive manner. In this session we will explore the commonalities of both professions, as well as the differences.


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Breakout Session: Sandra Minton: "Moving and Dancing the Curriculum"

Sandra Minton
Track

Children seem to remember information better when they are actively engaged. One way to achieve engagement is to use movement as a teaching tool. Children love to move and movement adds an element of novelty and fun to lessons. Justification of movement-based teaching can also be found in a number of educational theories; in research done on creative problem solving; and in recent discoveries in the neurosciences.


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Breakout Session: Cathy and Joe Mathia: "Great Beginnings with Group Piano"

Cathy Mathia
Track

his session deals with the essential elements of a good group experience for young pianists. Presented by a husband and wife duo, this topic will be considered from the perspectives of both an early childhood specialist and a pianist/piano teacher.


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Breakout Session: Jill Hannagan: "Introduction to Music Makers: At the Keyboard"

Jill Hannagan
Track

Participants will be led through a 5-week course that will give children a comprehensive introduction to group piano. Perfect as a summer camp offering, an introduction for new students or as an offering for those children who might be “aging out”of your current program. Singing, drumming, dancing, note reading, and keyboard skills will be actively explored in this session.


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Breakout Session: Cynthia Taggart:"Early Childhood Music and Movement Developmental Appropriateness Guidelines"

Cynthia Taggartt
Track

Portions of ECMMA’s emerging guidelines documents will be introduced and discussed. Participants will be encouraged to interact with the presenters as they discuss content within the various guideline categories, including the following developmentally appropriate areas: music, movement, inclusiveness with special needs, classroom environment, use of manipulatives, adult classroom support, and other important considerations in the ECMM setting.


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Breakout Session: Ginger Colla: "Combining Color, Music and Solfège: A Dynamic Synthesis and Integrated Method for Teaching Music"

Ginger Colla
Track

This interactive, hands-on session will feature an innovative, interdisciplinary music teaching method that illustrates in a logical, functional color-code the linear and vertical energy of melodic movement and harmonic progressions. Discover the power inherent in adding colors specific to their function within the diatonic system to your collection of effective teaching tools.


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Breakout Session: Eve Kodiak: "The Whole Elephant: A Developmental Approach to Integrating Music, Movement, Listening, and Speech"

Eve Kodiak
Track
Music teachers, listening therapists, movement and speech specialists – all have their particular perceptions about the world of the developing child. But all these “parts of the elephant” do not necessarily add up to an experience of the whole. Musical, movement speech, and listening development are all developing simultaneously in the “whole elephant” that is the growing child.

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Breakout Session: Eric Rasmussen: "Harmonic Function Understanding in Children One to Five Years Old"

Eric Rasmussen
Track

When were you introduced to tonic, dominant, and subdominant functions? When did you first understand them? I was “taught” them in high school music theory class during my junior year. Yet, I struggled in my college ear training classes. Why? I understood the theory I had been taught, but I had not understood their real essence. I propose that functions do not exist on paper, in explaining, or even in music notation. All of this is an abstraction away from the music that children come to naturally understand.


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General Session: David Gerry: "Active Music Classes in Infancy Enhance Musical, Communicative, and Social Development: Results from a Study"

David Gerry
Track

Researchers at McMaster University have discovered that possible benefits of musical training can begin even before your child can walk or talk. For 6 months, groups of babies and their parents partici-pated in one of two types of weekly music instruction. Now the class sessions are over and the results are in and fascinating differences were found between the groups. This talk will explain how this study was conducted and explore the musical and non-musical benefits of what is the first study of its kind to show the specific benefits of formal musical experience.


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Bridging art and science: using neuroscience to understand and advocate for music education

Kathleen Howland
Music Therapy Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 2 - see other required sessions

This session will review neuroscience research from the final trimester in the womb through preschool regarding music and cognition. We will look at the innate propensity for music and how to optimally develop that aptitude. We will consider how music cultivates language and cognition and the roles that parents and music education can play in this development. We will consider this early development in music in well aging. I believe that the only thing more important than music in optimal human development and functioning is love.


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Breakout Session: Petra Kern: "Tuneful Playground Interventions: Using Music for Purposeful Outdoor Play"

Petra Kern
Track

This session introduces evidence-based music activities and strategies for successful outdoor play. Learn how to create a musical playground environment, embed playground songs, and provide creative interdisciplinary learning opportunities for all children.


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Breakout Session: Joyce Jordan-DeCarbo and Joy Galliford: "Research Presentation"

Joyce Jordan-DeCarbo
Track

While the quantity and quality of research documenting the need for music interventions for at- risk populations has steadily increased over the past 15 years, research focusing on the benefits of music for children birth to three continues to be limited. This session will describe a research study done with infants and toddlers during the academic year 2008-2009.


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Breakout Session: Eve Kodiak: "Reflexes: The Rosetta Stone of Children’s Movement"

Eve Kodiak
Track

The primitive reflexes are an essential ingredient in the soup of human development. Understanding the signals children send us in “reflex” code, and knowing how to respond to these signals, can spell the difference between success and failure in communication, teaching, and nurturing. This workshop gives a practical overview of some of the key reflex movements, what they mean, and ways to integrate them through songs and games.


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Breakout Session: Amy Johnson: "Creative Movement: Teaching Children to Be Competent Movers and Expressive Individuals"

Amy Johnson
Track

When asked about creative movement, many have the image of turning on music and letting movement happen. Free dance, as many would call it. In order for children to truly benefit from and achieve success through creative movement, they must first have a movement foundation to base their movements upon. Creative movement is more than imitating a teacher and for true improvisation, children must have skills in movement. Through the development of skills, children will become competent movers and expressive individuals.


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Breakout Session: Kate Daneluk: "Genuine Music Education in the Faith-Based Environment"

Kate Daneluk
Track

Teaching in a faith-based environment offers specific challenges to the early childhood music teacher. By examining religious education through the eyes of Maria Montessori, whose work in religious education is often overlooked, and relating religious growth to the stages of Preparatory Audiation, an ancient and symbiotic relationship can be found between religious and music education. Neither discipline need be sacrificed.


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Breakout Session: Sally Woodson: "What Makes a Good Early Childhood Music Song?"

Sally Woodson
Track

We all know children are musical and all can achieve basic music competence.  Every child can learn to “speak” the language of music—to sing and move with tonal and rhythmic accuracy—and enjoy it, free from the pressure of “performance” standards.  But we also know that children need models of active music making by their parents and other primary caregivers in order to learn, and most adults in out culture are not active music makers.  The challenge is to provide experiences that engage children and the adults who love them.


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Breakout Session: Shawna Gordon: " Online Professional Development: From Premise to Promise"

Shawna Gordon
Track

Online learning has embedded itself into the landscape of the 21st century educational culture. From children’s games to college degrees, online opportunities are showing up wherever people want, or need, to learn. It is only natural that professional development opportunities become available online as well, but is online learning an appropriate model for skills-based early childhood music and movement certification programs?


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2012 ECMMA Banquet Presentation

2012 ECMMA Banquet Presentation
Track

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Breakout Session: Toward an Understanding of Young Children’s Musical Play

Toward an Understanding of Young Children’s Musical Play
Track

In this session, participants will explore one of the most fundamental aspects of child development – play. We will consider how musical play fits within what is known about young children’s object and symbolic play development.


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ECMMA 2012 Atlanta Announcement

ECMMA 2012 Atlanta Announcement
Track

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Breakout Session: Sarah McQuarrie: "Active Listening: Using Eyes, Nose, Fingers, and Toes"

Sarah McQuarrie
Track

In this hands-on session, participants will be introduced to lessons designed to actively involve children during listening experiences. Using listening selections from Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the Animals, the activities presented will demonstrate how children can show understanding of music and musical concepts through responsive movement. Based on the ideas Jerome Bruner’s enactive learning, the research of Edwin Gordon, and the concept of Eurhythmics developed by Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, the pedagogical relationship between movement and music will be explored throughout the session.


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Breakout Session: Rick Townsend: "Engaging Laban: Aesthetic Connection in Early Childhood Music Classes"

Rick Townsend
Track

Movement activities serve many important purposes in our early childhood music classes -  including metric/rhythmic development, classroom management and physical/emotional/mental development just to name a few. Where do aesthetic outcomes fit into this picture? In this workshop, Dr. Townsend a) defines the Aesthetic Process, b) describes aesthetic outcomes for young musicians, c) explains Laban’s theories as they relate to the subject and d) addresses Laban-based activities that can help our young children develop their own aesthetic sensitivities.


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Breakout Session: Mary Stouffer: "Hickory Dickory Dock:Rhymes, Songs, and Games for the Very Young"

Mary Stouffer
Track

In this session, favorite rhymes and songs will be shared, focusing on the primary goal of bringing the joy of music to young children with the added result of supporting the development of fundamental musical skills. Follow the musical progression from babies to children age 4. Learn how to take a rhyme or song and use it for different ages, creating a developmentally appropriate musical game.


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Breakout Session: Carol Penney: "Essential Ingredients of a Successful Learning Environment"

Carol Penney
Track

Music is the perfect vehicle for an integrated learning experience for preschoolers with activities that support the development of the brain’s executive function. Explore how music educators can support focus, cognitive flexibility, working memory and inhibitory control. Another essential ingredient for a successful learning environment is the educator’s approach in permeating the classroom with trust, respect and presence.


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Breakout Session: David Gerry: "Music and Infants: The Effects of Enculturation and Training on Development"

David Gerry
Track

What effect does enculturation have on musical development? What role does formal musical experi-ence play? What are early developing universal constraints? Drawing on recent research, this session will explore the various elements that together affect musical development in infants and young children. This talk will be of interest to all early childhood educators interested in understanding more about brain development and music.


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Breakout Session: David Kisor: "Songs that Promote Social-Emotional Development"

David Kisor
Track

Research findings support the fact that 1) acquisition of social-emotional skills in early childhood is of primary importance, and 2) using songs, movement and associated activities as primary vehicles for acquiring these skills leaves a lifelong positive impression.

Participants will learn how songs can be used to promote social and emotional development in young children. They will also understand the effectiveness of music as a learning tool. Finally they will understand how simple repetitive interventions can effectively result in social skill acquisition.


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Breakout Session: Donna Metler: "If He’s So Smart, Why Does He Act So Silly?"

Donna Metler
Track

This session will give educators a bit of background into cognitive asynchronity (giftedness), how it can be demonstrated in the 0-7 age range, and strategies for reaching these students in a classroom setting while not losing the rest of the group.


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General Session: Craig Woodson: "A World Orchestra You Can Build Program"

Craig Woodson
Track

Dr. Woodson will present his ‘World Orchestra You Can Build’ program on making and playing twelve instruments from around the world. This entertaining presentation includes continuous audience participation and includes how music originated with animals sounds and food technology. To conclude, each audience member will make and play the five-in-one ‘Drumpet’, a combination drum, trumpet, scraper, bonker, and string instrument — a ‘composite’ lesson that includes composition and conducting.


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General Session: Carol Penney: "In This Circle Dance Together"

Carol Penney
Track

Music experiences in early childhood can drastically change the lives of the 133 million children born in the world each year. As music educators, our collective mission is to bring music to children. We are all working to make the world better…for children…for families….for the future. We are all inside this circle of caring, together. We are all making a very similar—and powerful—difference in the circles within our own communities. We all believe in the power of music to make a difference.


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Breakout Session: Jill Trinka: "Great Repertoire for Children Ages 3-6"

Jill Trinka
Track

This session is a continuation of Sunday night’s general session. Participants will learn additional repertoire as they investigate ways to plumb the depths of rhymes and songs so as to recycle repertoire within a spiral curriculum to address different pedagogic purposes. Specific examples of the numerous functions a single piece can fulfill will be presented. Further emphasis will be on identifying curricular goals, concepts, and skills.


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Planning Musical Experience in Early Childhood

Sylvia Munsen
Pedagogy Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 2 - see other required sessions

Participants will experience activities appropriate for young children focusing on musical engagement and the development of independent and collaborative musicianship skills. This session will present the planning, implementation, sequencing, and assessment of the activities including opportunities for children to experience and reinforce elements of music (melody, rhythm, timbre, form, dynamics) through areas of musical participation (singing, moving, playing, listening, creating, reading) and strategies for motivating children to fully participate in the musical experience.


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Young children's 'musicking' and the social world Music is a social activity.

Beatriz Ilari
Research Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 1 - see other required sessions

Music is a social activity. As members of cultural groups, young children engage in music in many ways and with different companions. This session examines young children's musical engagement from a social perspective. Three building blocks of social cognition and their relationships with children's musicking are explored, providing a framework to discuss current research on early interactions, rhythmic synchronization and musical play.


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Sustaining Our Spirit to Teach

Susan Kaplan
Trainer, Holistic Wellness

“….the more one loves teaching, the more heart-breaking it can be.”

Parker Palmer says “We became teachers for reasons of the heart, animated by a passion for [music] and for helping people to learn. But many of use lose heart as the years of teaching go by.” Any number of things can affect our spirit, such as changing teaching standards, the type and number of students, and how we feel we belong in the wider school community.


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Cultural Celebration

Dr. Sylvia Munsen
Pedagogy Track

Participants will experience activities appropriate for young children focusing on music from many cultures and traditions. Participants will experience and explore a variety of materials: folk songs, folk instruments, movement/dances, and literature. The teaching strategies will be based on Orff-Schulwerk philosophy and teaching process.


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When “Baby Beluga” comes home and “Tikitiklip” goes to school: The complex matrix of young children’s everyday music

Dr. Beatriz Ilari
Research Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 1 - see other required sessions

This session explores the complex matrix of young children’s everyday musical experiences and their applications in early childhood music education—research and practice. Based on recent theorizing in the field of Childhood Studies, we will engage in a wide range of activities—from the examination of young children’s everyday musical practices around the world to the actual enactment of musical activities and brainstorming of future research questions.


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Music therapy and music education in early childhood development

Dr. Kathleen Howland
Music Therapy Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 2 - see other required sessions

This session will look at the intersections and correlations of music education and music therapy in early childhood. This session will distinguish the main tenets of each and the opportunities for collaborating to meet the needs of neurotypical children as well as those with special needs. This session will include the works of Edwin Gordon (my mentor) as well as those of preeminent neuroscientists studying music and movement, language and cognition.


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Books that Sing - Stories that Dance! Incorporating Music, Movement, and Imagination with Literature!

Lara Davis
Pedagogy Track

This active session will enhance dramatic skills through interactive participation! Attendees will explore techniques for integrating music & movement with books & storytelling to promote fundamental music concepts, creativity, cross-curricular connections, and literacy with their young students. Activities will range from expanding rhythmic text into simple song & finger plays - to full dramatization incorporating movement, instruments, props, classical listening selections, and more!


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1-2-3 Flow!

Dr. Patricia Gingras
Movement Track

Children of all ages express themselves by moving to music. The first step in this process is the development of rhythm skills. We've all seen young children moving to the beat; yet, research has suggested that providing activities that allow children to move with continuous flow motion (which encourages them to feel the space between the beats) is just as important to rhythmic development. Explore fun-filled and creative flow movement activities suitable for young children so that you, too, can say, "1, 2, 3, flow!"


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Mama's Turn: A Mother's Musical Journey

Ms Christa Kuebel, Mrs Sarah Smith & Dr. Lisa Koops
Research Track

The purpose of this narrative inquiry was to document the musical journey of a mother, Betsy[1], taking weekly piano lessons beginning in the summer of 2013. The research questions explored the influence of the mother’s musical journey on her three young children’s musical expression, on their expressed desires to participate in music outside of their current experiences, and on Betsy’s experience of musical parenting.


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FROM FIGHT, FLIGHT, FREEZE! TO BREATHE, SMILE, MOVE!

Ms Eve Kodiak
Movement Track

We tend to look upon behaviors - both ours and our students - as voluntary. But when our survival systems are activated, none of us is totally acting out of choice. Our primitive reflexes take over until the brain/body system signals that we are safe. We'll learn how to recognize when Fight, Flight, and Freeze! are at play. We will also learn ways - both in one-on-one and group situations - to redirect and release these primitive reflexes and bring ourselves and our students to a place of choice. Music and movement games are wonderful integration tools! Handouts provided.


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Singing Voice Development in Early Childhood

Dr. Christina Svec
Pedagogy Track

Singing voice development begins in early childhood and can be encouraged through repertoire with the developmental component in mind. Svec will briefly discuss the research behind singing voice development for children, ages 4-7. Additionally, the audience will experience and participate in vocal exploration and melodic improvisation activities as well as view classroom examples of video footage demonstrating what activities look like with children in both early childhood music classes and early elementary music settings.


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Music Therapy Interventions to Support Social Development in Early Childhood Inclusion Classrooms

Dr Andrew Knight
Music Therapy Track
1 of 3 required sessions for CMTE 1 - see other required sessions

During this session, participants will experience ways to design clinical interventions for the early-childhood inclusion classroom to support the development of social skills for all students. Skills include joint attention, turn-taking, greetings and responses. Participants will be introduced to relevant social development theories, research, and resources.


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Exploring Early Childhood Music Literacy

Dr. Brittany May & Emilee Knell
Research Track

In 2014, the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) established a conceptual framework for arts learning with a focus on artistic literacy. The new standards identify artistic processes and creative practices in which artists engage: creating, performing, responding, and connecting (NCCAS, n.d.). These standards introduce a contemporary interpretation of music literacy.


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Climate Change: Envisioning Music Teachers' Roles in Shaping 21st Century Early Childhood Music Education Policy, Research, and Practice

Dr. Alison M. Reynolds & Dr. Diana R. Dansereau
Research Track

Early childhood music teachers are in an ideal position to contribute to understandings of the roles young children’s participation in music plays in their social, emotional, cognitive, and physiological development. In this session, the facilitators share recent findings from the National Endowment of the Arts regarding early childhood arts participation. Using those as a springboard for discussion, participants will (1) identify research topics for national-scale studies, and (2) begin discussing ways to carry out research collaboratively.


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Keep Singing YOUR Tune, and Families will Dance Right into Your Studio!

Ms Jane Spinney
Pedagogy & Music Therapy Track

Keep singing and moving to your tune! With passion, dedication and determination, your song will be heard by families who will dance right to you and your studio. This session endeavors to inspire the entrepreneurial spirit to build and grow a successful early childhood music & piano studio. Business strategies to be explored include: how to start, creating a mission statement, advertising & recruitment, time management, social media tools, accounting, taxes and more.


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Let's Jam!: Creating Jam Sessions with Young Children

Dr. Kerry Renzoni
Pedagogy Track

In this interactive workshop, learn how to create engaging jam sessions that help young children develop music vocabulary, encourage them to take creative music-making risks, and create community with other children, caregivers, and teachers. You will receive a handout with helpful strategies for creating jam sessions in your classroom and encouraging parents to jam at home with their children.


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Guided imagery, movement, and mindfulness in Early Childhood Education

Alexia Buono
Movement Track

In this movement session, we will explore and discover ways of moving creatively, mindfully, and expressively in early childhood classrooms and settings, as well as how to exercise guided imagery meditations with young children. We will discuss and practice ways of creating a safe external environment and personal internal space for movement within the classroom culture. Noticing where we are, as adults, with our own Body and movements is an important first step to integrating movement and mindfulness with young children.


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Want to Learn to Play Music? Start By Playing WITH Music!

Dr Andrew Knight
Pedagogy Track

This session explores how children learn music through play, including the benefits and characteristics of music play. Before children can play (i.e. perform) music, they must first play with music. In this session, participants will discover the ways in which exposing children to developmentally appropriate, non performance-oriented music activities supports a child's innate tendency to play.


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A Cross-sectional Examination of Children's Interactivities with the iPad App: Carnival of the Animals

Dr. Catherine Ming Tu & Joshua Hernandez
Research Track

A Cross-sectional Examination of Children's Interactivities with the iPad App: Carnival of the Animals


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Music as science and art: The influence of music training at the Froebel Educational Institute on Kindergarten music instruction in North America (1850-1950)

Dr. Martina Miranda
Research Track

During the 1850s kindergarten leaders established the first kindergarten programs in North America, based on their personal study of Froebel’s methods. After visiting Europe leaders such as Margarethe Schurz (1832-1876), Elizabeth Peabody (1804-1894), and Susan Blow (1843-1916) established Froebelian Kindergarten programs in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and Missouri respectively.


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Engaging & Healing Differences: Five Habits of the Heart*

Susan Kaplan
Music Therapy Track

Engaging & Healing Differences focuses on Five Habits of the Heart, a practice of fresh and meaningful conversations.  Using the Five Habits of the Heart, you will experience how to use these habits through movement ideas, reflection activities and songs. This program creates a safe place to talk about what really matters in our schools.  Conflicts arise between students (and adults) often based on differences ~ of opinions & beliefs, across racial or religious differences, based on external distinctions (i.e.


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Summer Songs, Toddle Tunes and Dribble Dance

Mrs Saskia Beverloo
Pedagogy Track

Parents and their young children (0 – 4 year olds) love to come to music class. Behind the fun is the pedagogy: each of the activities stimulates one or more development areas like language and speech development, motor skills, social development and musical development.

In this session the audience will be involved in singing, dancing, rhythm games, finger play and sound games. The activities will be followed by a closer look into the developmental goals of each activity and insights in how to make a balanced music program.


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Music Learning Theory: An Introduction

Hannah Creviston
Movement Track

What is Music Learning Theory? What is audiation? How do we develop each child's innate potential for music learning? How do we encourage active participation? Am I teaching in the way that children learn? This session will introduce music learning theory and its basic principles, as well as giving various activities and ways to incorporate its basics this teaching method into your everyday teaching routine.


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Scared of a 'Group' of Young Beginners? Try Piano Partners!

Dr Mary Louise Wilson
Pedagogy Track

Group keyboard classes can offer many benefits for young children--from problem-solving to building aural skills; from goal setting to playing by ear and note-reading. The peer-group setting can create an ideal music learning environment for children. But teaching group keyboard classes can be intimidating for traditional piano teachers who generally teach one-on-one lessons. This session will introduce the concept of 'partner lessons' which can offer the same benefits as group keyboard classes but be taught to two young children in a small studio setting with one piano.


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Cultural Preservation Through Childhood Songs: The Vietnamese American Lens

Ms. Tina Huynh
Research Track

Cultural Preservation Through Childhood Songs: The Vietnamese American Lens. The Over 1.5 million Vietnamese American refugees and immigrants live in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010), primarily due to the aftermath of the Vietnam War. Acculturation of Vietnamese Americans has led to sociological discourse in the past couple of decades (Lieu, 2002). However, issues pertaining to cultural preservation, particularly in early childhood music, remain largely unexplored.


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School Readiness: Can A Literacy-based Music Curriculum Enhance Linguistic Skills in Preschool Children?

Catherine Ming Tu & Brenda Hannon
Research Track

The impact of music on student cognitive development has been a focal issue of research related to neuroscience and music education since the 90s (Costa-Giomi, 2014; Hallam, 2010; Shore, 1997; Strait & Kraus, 2011). Previous research revealed some consistent findings that music lessons promote intellectual development. For instance, Schellenberg (2004) conducted a study in which 6-year-olds (N=144) were randomly assigned to two different types of music lessons (keyboard or voice) or to control groups that received drama lessons or no lessons.


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Parents as Musical Models

Ms Christa Kuebel
Research Track

Increasing attention is being given to the influence of the home environment on the musical growth of infants and toddlers. For example, parents and caregivers have been found to create a musical environment through “motherese,” or Infant Directed Speech, and Infant Directed Song (Barrett, 2009; Trehub, 2003; Trehub et al., 1997). Adults use these interactions to communicate and bond with children, as educational tools, and to help with routines and daily tasks.


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Renew Your Spirit: Explore the Seeds of Your Teaching Work

Susan Kaplan
Music Therapy Track

Everything is blooming most recklessly; if it were voices instead of colors, there would be an unbelievable shrieking into the heart of the night.” ~ Rainer Maria Rilke

As teachers we have dedicated our professional and personal life to serving others. Yet many of us experience teaching as demanding and challenging, as we face the daily tensions of meeting the needs of our students in a complicated system that doesn’t always support our vision.


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An Examination of the Emotional Competency and Emotional Practices of Four Elementary General Music Teachers

Dr. Michelle McConkey
Research Track

Emotional competence is the capacity to handle emotional situations effectively. Teachers’ emotional competence influences the choices they make, both pedagogically, and during student interactions. This qualitative multiple case study examines the lived experiences of four elementary general music teachers for the purposes of exploring emotional competence as related to perceptions and practices in the classroom. Research questions included: Is it possible to observe a music teacher’s emotional competence in action?


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Saving kitties and hunting for gold: Storytelling through music and movement in early childhood

Dr. Elisabeth Etopio, Ms. Casey Bellafaire
Movement Track

Explore elements of storytelling in this session as we become fearless pirates, awesome dinosaurs, neighborhood superheroes, and more! Participants will engage in music and movement experiences designed to capture young children's imagination, cultivate creativity, and build essential listening and speaking vocabularies foundational to music learning. Strategies and skills for implementing a variety of music and movement stories will be shared.


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Online Professional Development in Preschool Settings: Music Education Training for Early Childhood Generalists

Dr. Terri Lenzo
Research Track

The title of this study is Online Professional Development in Preschool Settings: Music Education Training for Early Childhood Generalists. An online format showed promise for ameliorating specific training barriers faced by this population such as time and financial commitments, self-efficacy for leading musical activities, and cultural misconceptions regarding musical development and music teaching. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of an online training program for increasing preschool generalist self-efficacy for leading musical activities.


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Research Roundup

Dr. Alison M. Reynolds & Dr. Diana R. Dansereau
Research Track

This session offers Convention participants a forum for (1) reflection on questions, methods, and findings presented during research sessions at the ECMMA International Convention--in partnership with the NAfME Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group--and (2) collaborative discussion about identifying implications for practice and considering possible follow-up studies. To prepare the discussion, the facilitators will offer a summary of the nine research presentations at this Convention. Following the review, breakout groups will engage in discussion.


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"Sit Still and Listen!" "Pay Attention!"

Cathy Mathia
Movement Track

But how can they? Their wiggly bodies need to move. When our children have opportunities to move and sing purposefully in a joy-filled environment, they have the energy to sit and listen. This session’s activities emphasize body control, language development, working in groups, and learning concepts. Join us as we experience a variety of activities from the core areas of music learning: Move, Listen, Sing and Play. 
 


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